Supported Learning Groups Launch for the 20th Year

For the last 19 years, thousands of undergraduate students at the University of Guelph have participated in Supported Learning Groups (SLGs) – a program that had a huge impact on their academic success. This week, 40-plus SLG leaders will introduce themselves to classes around campus and invite students to attend SLGs this year.

SLGs are review sessions for difficult courses led by upper year students who have already taken the course, and have achieved good grades. SLG leaders re-attend lectures so they can get the same experience of lectures as current students, then they plan and facilitate group study sessions to review the lecture content. SLGs are free of charge, voluntary, and attendance is not shared with faculty.

“I’ve heard that SLGs are very helpful and I decided to try it out,” said a previous attendee. “I wanted to stay on track for the course workload throughout the semester and I thought it would help me better understand the material presented in lecture.”

Students are at times surprised to learn that SLG leaders do not answer their questions about course content. Research shows that students do significantly better in courses when they are guided to find the answer themselves by using resources effectively and by learning from one another in a group setting.

“SLGs are where I do most of my learning,” said a student. “They forced me to go through the material every week. The close knit groups made it easy to ask questions and help one another out. I find talking and reviewing materials in smaller groups allows you to hear information in different words [than the lecture]. I also enjoy being able to comfortably ask questions.”

The best thing about SLGs? They’re proven to work. Research has consistently shown that SLG attendance improves student grades, reduces failures and withdrawals, and significantly increases students’ odds of persistence and graduation.

Check out the schedule of Supported Learning Groups for fall 2017! Try SLGs for guaranteed study time, to meet people, to learn how to learn, and to test your knowledge prior to exams.